Sunday, 20 January 2013

Kate Shepherd 'Past Tense Conditional' at Bartha Contemporary, London





 




A slick show of abstract paintings 'Past Tense Conditional' by the American artist Kate Shepherd. 'A suite of new paper block assemblages complete the installation of Kate Shepherd’s first exhibition at Bartha Contemporary. Derived out of repeated elongated triangular forms, both recognizable in their foundations and also combined as larger sections, they are graphical in appearance, but play with a language of colour studies, children’s blocks and corporate logos. Arranged along shelves, each work part of a larger set can be turned and reconfigured. Each arrangement reveals new surprising structures within this playful series.' very Ellsworth Kelly with reflective glass frames...exhibition lasts until 2 Feb 2013.
 
See more here
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Great show 'Inventing Abstraction' at MOMA, New York

František Kupka. <i>Localization of Graphic Motifs II.</i> 1912–13. Oil on canvas, 78 3/4 x 76 3/8" (200 x 194 cm), frame: 78 3/4 x 76 3/8" (200 x 194 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund and Gift of Jan and Meda Mladek. Image courtesy of the National Gallery of Art, Washington. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris
 
František Kupka. Localization of Graphic Motifs II. 1912–13. Oil on canvas,
78 3/4 x 76 3/8" (200 x 194 cm), frame: 78 3/4 x 76 3/8" (200 x 194 cm).
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.,
 
This looks like a great show, I am interested if anyone in New York has seen it?
 
'In 1912, in several European cities, a handful of artists—Vasily Kandinsky, Frantisek Kupka, Francis Picabia, and Robert Delaunay—presented the first abstract pictures to the public. Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925 celebrates the centennial of this bold new type of artwork, tracing the development of abstraction as it moved through a network of modern artists, from Marsden Hartley and Marcel Duchamp to Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, sweeping across nations and across media. The exhibition brings together many of the most influential works in abstraction’s early history and covers a wide range of artistic production, including paintings, drawings, books, sculptures, films, photographs, sound poems, atonal music, and non-narrative dance, to draw a cross-media portrait of these watershed years.'

see video Behind the Scenes here http://www.moma.org/explore/multimedia/videos/250/1200